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Tag:Clippers
Posted on: November 21, 2010 12:36 pm
 

"Quake" Griffin shakes the Knicks to their core

Postd by Matt Moore

I'm not going to waste your time with prose, analysis, or description Just watch the mayhem Blake Griffin brought upon the world last night.




And that, my friends, is why "Quake" Griffin (as he was coined this morning on Twitter by @Winston_Wolfe ) is the most exciting player in the NBA right now. His defense is atrocious, his awareness needs major upgrades, and his team is wretched beyond belief. But man alive, can he make you holler with his play. Every time I watch these highlights, I recoil in horror. It's like seeing someone get hit by a car.
Posted on: November 2, 2010 10:57 am
 

Game Changer 11.2.10

Deng does work with his mid-range, the Raptors do no work on the glass in the fourth, and Gordon does demolition work on the rim. All that and more in this edition of the Game Changer .
Posted by Matt Moore


Each game is made up of elements which help formulate the outcome. Monday through Friday, we'll bring you the elements from the night before's games in our own specialized version of the game recaps. It's not everything that happened, but it's an insight into what lead to the results you'll see in the box scores. This is the Game Changer .

THE BIG ONE: DENG DOIN' WORK


In general, Nicolas Batum is a good defensive player. So is Wesley Matthews. Unfortunately, last night, they were completely overwhelmed by the rarest of finds: a fully functional Luol Deng. Not hampered by injury, a poor offensive system, or mental distractions, last night is a perfect example of what can happen when Deng is feeling it. Particularly, Deng's game is focused on the mid-range J. It's a highly inefficient shot, which is why he so rarely has nights like this. But when it's falling? Good night, nurse. Deng dropped 40 on the Bulls in a game that wasn't close right from the start. The Blazers just looked overwhelmed defensively. They couldn't protect the rim, and nothing was going to work on Deng. He kept nailing pull-up jumpers off the dribble, forcing them to close. Then he pump faked and got to the line. Take a look at his shot chart from CBSSports.com's Game Tracker .



That's a pretty good night from the field. When you're hot, you're hot.

Other than that? Not much to report. The Bulls' defense wasn't really all that stout, allowing a 110.1 efficiency for Portland, despite the Blazers shooting 41% from the field and 0.00% from the arc. 0-14 from the stripe for the Blazers. It was that kind of night. But 41 free throws helped them avoid getting wiped off the map while still being down too much to climb back from. The Blazers just looked a step behind on all their rotations, and the Bulls' offense was functioning at an extremely high level. Derrick Rose finishe with 16, 13, and 5, with 6 turnovers, and made a few absolutely gorgeous cross-court skip passes to Deng for open threes behind the baseline off-ball screen. Stuff you did not see out of the Bulls last year. Thibs has the offense going well, and with Deng hitting the jumper, that was all she wrote.

GO-GO-GADGET LINES OF THE NIGHT:

Luol Deng: 40 points on 14-19 shooting, 4 rebounds, 2 assists, 1 steal, +19

Tyreke Evans: 23 points on 9-16 shooting, 7 rebound, 5 assists, 2 steals, 1 block

Gary Neal: 16 points, 4-8 from 3-point land, 6 rebounds, 2 assists

Eric Gordon: 23 points, 4 rebounds, 11 assists, 2 steals, 2 turnovers, only Clippers starter with postiive plus/minus


DON'T MISS:

Ken Berger posts on how the league needs to take note of what happened in the NHL Lockout. Check out Ken's Post-Ups with news from around the league on several subjects, including Derrick Favors, Nicolas Batum, and how the league is approaching the Knicks investigation. Be sure to check out the horror, the horror of the Mike Conley extension, and Royce Young covers what we learned in week one .


RAPTORS BOARD OUT OF THEIR MINDS:


The Raptors held a 34-25 advantage on the glass headed into last night's fourth quarter against the Kings. In related news, they held an eight point advantage. In the fourth quarter alone, they lost the rebounding battle by double (14-7, advantage Kings), and were outscored by 11. That was your ballgame. Andrea Bargnani was, for some weird reason, matched up with the bulkier, meaner DeMarcus Cousins, while Reggie Evans was forced to try and hold off the wiry, quicker Carl Landry. It made absolutely no sense and the results bore out. The Raptors had this game on lockdown and just let the Kings take it away from them. This despite Evans finishing with 19 rebounds, 10 offensive. That would make them Never Be Closing, I suppose.

VIDEO-A-GO-GO


In case you missed it last night:




BENCH MOBBED:


The Clippers bench was outscored 32-7 last night in a nine point loss. For those of you keeping track, that means that the starters managed to outscore San Antonio's, but they couldn't handle Gary Neal and James Anderson. It at once says that the Clippers are far too woefully thin to be considered anything close to a playoff team this year, and that the Spurs have once again added young, versatile pieces which will help them this season. One game does not a season make, but the success the Spurs are having is a product of the system, and solid player acquisition. The smart get smarter, the Clips get Clipper.

AND FINALLY:

Loud noises!



Follow F&R on Twitter at @CBSSportsNBA and check out our RSS feed . This has been your daily edition of the Game Changer .
Posted on: November 1, 2010 11:42 pm
Edited on: November 1, 2010 11:59 pm
 

Eric Gordon annihilates the rim

Posterized: adj. See: Anderson, James. Victim of: Gordon, Eric.
Posted by Matt Moore


I'm not even going to comment.



Okay, I'll comment briefly. As I said on Twitter, "Gordon just strapped C4 to the rim and said "Equipment Manager, please start over."

Yikes.

Posted on: October 22, 2010 11:52 pm
Edited on: October 22, 2010 11:53 pm
 

Pacific Division preview: Who's second best?

Posted by Royce Young



Read Ken Berger's full Pacific Division preview

One Burning Question: Who's the second best player in the Pacific?

I read something interesting by a columnist in Los Angeles earlier in the week. To summarize, basically he said Blake Griffin was the second best player in LA. Not "going to be" or "at some point will be." Nope. Right now, Griffin is one slot behind Kobe Bryant. So if Griffin is the second best player in LA, could he be the second best in the entire division?

(To refresh in case you don't have the depth charts in front of you, Pau Gasol, Ron Artest, Steve Nash, Baron Davis, Stephen Curry, David Lee, Monta Ellis and Tyreke Evans all play in the Pacific.)

I love Blake Griffin. Love everything about him. I'm an Oklahoman, went to the University of Oklahoma when Blake was there and even played little league baseball with his brother Taylor. I'm a total Blake Griffin homer. But second best in LA or the entire Pacific Divison? No. I mean, no. No way.

But the thing is, this is an open question. Griffin isn't in that slot, though I certainly think he'll be able to lay claim to that and probably in the near future, will be able to say he's the top dog in the town. But behind Kobe, figuring out who would be No. 2 isn't easy. Gasol has a great case. So does Steve Nash who has two MVP trophies. Then there's Tyreke Evans who is absolutely ridiculous. In terms of pure, young basketball talent, you're going to find plenty in the Pacific.

Since I'm asking the question, I'll give you my answer: Pau Gasol. But that's an incredibly close call with Evans. In fact, give me 10 minutes and I might change my mind. Nash is great, but not what he once was. Stephen Curry could be that guy, but he's not there yet. Baron Davis certainly looks like it some nights, but on others you wonder if he's even the second best player on his own team.

At the end of the season, this question might have a clearer answer. Heck, it could easily be Blake Griffin. In fact, I feel like the odds are pretty good there because Griffin is an absolutely insane basketball talent. But now? You've got to go with what you know and right now, we now that Pau Gasol is pretty stinking fantastic.
Posted on: October 19, 2010 8:38 pm
Edited on: October 19, 2010 8:39 pm
 

Magic sells his 105 Starbucks; what's he up to?

Posted by Royce Young

A day after Laker legend Magic Johnson sold his 4.5 percent share in the Los Angeles Lakers, he has also sold his 105 Starbucks franchises he owns back to the company he purchased them from for over $100 million, the Los Angeles Times reports.

Adding today's sale with yesterday's, Magic has quickly put upwards of $160 million in his pocket quickly. So the question is, what is he up to?

A source tells the L.A. Times that he's not necessarily interested in purchasing an NBA franchise as is widely rumored. But the source told the paper he's interesting in something "in sports."

At different points, Johnson was linked to potentially buying the Detroit Pistons and Golden State Warriors, though those rumors have been refuted a bit. And if he's not interested in buying, could he be having financial issues? The source says that's not the case but in these two cases, they were just good "business decisions." As mentioned earlier, Magic reportedly got a Godfather offer from Dr. Patrick Soon-Shiong that he couldn't refuse.

While obviously most feel that Magic is looking into potentially purchasing an NBA franchise much like his buddy Michael Jordan, some feel Johnson could actually be interested in the Los Angeles Dodgers. And that throws a curveball into the whole thing (that was lame, I apologize).

But if Johnson decided to make a play in the NBA, here's the top five franchises I hope he buys.

1. Los Angeles Clippers - I don't know if he would, but this seems like it makes a lot of sense. At the same time, it doesn't make any. Johnson is forever a Laker and for him to purchase the in-town rival seems a little weird. But Donald Sterling's time is up and Johnson could be the perfect guy to step into that franchise. Plus, Johnson stays in L.A., stays in the Staples Center and stays in the bright lights. I'm rooting for this.

2. New Orleans Hornets - The sale of the Hornets is stalled and maybe this is an opportunity for Johnson to swoop in and reinvigorate the franchise. And something seems right about Magic Johnson being Chris Paul's boss.

3. Indiana Pacers - Granted, the Pacers aren't really for sale, but they are in a bit of danger of leaving Indianapolis. The city approved a new bill to tie the Pacers to the downtown arena, but still things are great in Indy for the Pacers. Forget all that stuff though, I'm just thinking about uniting Magic and Larry Bird together in the front office. I think that would be cool.

4. Phoenix Suns - Robert Sarver is known as a pretty tight, greedy owner in which his team has won in spite of. He's long been rumored to potentially be parting with the team at some point and having Johnson take over would work. The Suns are a fun West Coast franchise that should always be a staple in the Western Conference. Maybe Magic could give them a bump.

5. Memphis Grizzlies - I think most agree it's kind of Michael Heisley's time to go. Especially after his disastrous interview in which he revealed he really didn't know what he was doing.

Again, Johnson isn't necessarily buying, but I'm here to speculate so that's what I did. He's selling stuff off for some reason and it makes sense for him to get in the NBA ownership game. And as well-spoken and business-minded he is, I can't help but think he'd be as excellent at it as he was at basketball.
Posted on: October 15, 2010 11:59 am
 

MeloDrama Update: Clippers are a no-go

Melo still looking for trade, but not to Clippers, because they are the Clippers.
Posted by Matt Moore


Hidden beneath the glossy veneer of Carmelo Anthony's 30-point, 14 rebound performance last night is the fact that the situation regarding Carmelo's trade request still looms over the team. And recent reports suggest the problem is getting worse, not better, despite Melo dropping bombs on the floor.

The Denver Post today reports of a source confirming much of what KB let us in on last week : Melo still wants out, still wants the Knicks (which isn't happening), won't take a trade to the Sixers, and the Bulls deal won't be happening if the Bulls won't give up Joakim Noah (which they won't).
The interesting takeaway from the Post is that Melo won't agree to a trade to the Clippers.

Just to put this in perspective, the superstar who is specifically looking for a trade to a major market to expand his brand refuses to be traded to the NBA's second biggest market, to play alongside Blake Griffin, Eric Gordon, and Baron Davis. There are a lot of reasons, but the biggest rhymes with Stonald Derling.

So while the Clippers are off the table along with the Sixers, Kings, Wolves, and pretty much every other small market team, the Nets keep hanging around, dangling Derrick Favors in all his glorious "might take five years to drag something productive out of him" glory. For whatever reason, the Post's source thinks the Nuggets want Favors. Seems kind of risky to hinge trading your superstar on that kid, but hey. He's supposed to be the next Tim Duncan, or whatever.

Meanwhile, the situation continues to drag on, as Denver tries to figure out what it wants that Melo will agree to. Melo's still dropping huge numbers, so there's not much pressure on them. The question is just who will cave first to the other's requirements.
Posted on: August 26, 2010 8:41 am
Edited on: August 26, 2010 9:19 am
 

Shootaround 8.26.10: Heat defense and Boom fat

More on Heisley's train wreck, Chinese investor deal falls through for the Cavs, the Heat defense, and Baron Davis' fat.
Posted by Matt Moore


Earlier in the week we told you about Michael Heisley's train wreck on Memphis radio . Now, Chris Herrington writing for the Memphis Flyer has gone through the interview quote by quote to outline just how off Heisley is in his logic and assertions. It's so bad that Herrington had to break it into two parts . That's a fairly impressive crash and burn for the owner of a major sports league franchise.

How good are the Heat going to be on defense? That's the question John Krolik walks us through on Pro Basketball Talk. Krolik asserts that Wade and James are not only terrific perimeter defenders, but their weaknesses should be covered by the other's strengths (ex. Wade's weak post-defense can be managed by James' strength there). The big questions, predictably, surround their low-post defense and it's likely going to be up to Bosh to step up for the Heat to be dominant defensively. Bosh is going to have to be the player he was treated as and paid to be in free agency, with a complete game to go alongside those pretty jumpers and rebounds.

Former NBA player Jay Vincent has been indicted in an internet scam fraud.

The deal to bring in Chinese investors to the Cavaliers fell apart months ago , via the Cleveland Plain-Dealer. The investment was partially targeted by Cavs ownership to help woo LeBron James. It represents just another in a long series of events that likely did not help the Cavs in retaining James, despite a feeling from most people that his relocation was planned out months or maybe even years ago. If there was any chance of him changing his mind, front-office moves and things like this deal falling apart likely didn't help instill confidence from him in the franchise or its future.

Danny Ferry has rejoined the Spurs and will oversee their D-League affiliate among other duties. The Spurs take the operation of their affiliate very seriously and Ferry is a prime candidate for this kind of job. It's likely a welcome relief to be working with players that want a job again after his recent experiences.

Long story short: fouling or not fouling when up three will pretty much net you the same win percentage. Go figure. No, seriously, go figure, because the math behind this stuff is fairly complicated.

Baron Davis refutes a report that he's gone tubbo. No word on if he's also going to refute the assertion that he's lazy, injury-prone and inefficient.

Scottie Pippen's getting his own statue , which is pretty neat for him. Of course the best pose of him won't make it: him standing over Patrick Ewing.

A Stern Warning reports that Patty Mills will remain a Blazer this season .

Some really great news for Mikhail Torrance, who suffered a heart attack in a work-out, collapsed, and slipped into a coma. He's breathing on his own again .





Posted on: August 19, 2010 6:18 pm
Edited on: August 19, 2010 6:30 pm
 

How much is enough with Donald Sterling?

Clippers owner somehow outdoes himself in bringing disgrace to the league each year. How much is enough for David Stern and the rest of NBA ownership?
Posted by Matt Moore


A lot of complaints are made about NBA ownership. "My owner spends too much", or, more often, "spends too little." "They meddle too much." "They're too much of a distraction." For being the guy paying the bills, we expect an awful lot from them, even if it's fans' money supplying the money for those checks. But for the most part, NBA owners do all right. Their biggest crime most often is wanting to win, and thinking they have a good idea of how to go about that.

And then there's Donald Sterling.

Sterling, an NBA owner for 29 years, has been a disgrace to the NBA in every sense of the word. Most often, refusing to invest in order to compete is the charge against him. Which isn't exactly anything new in the NBA. Except that he operates in the top market in the league, capable of clearing a profit with even the slightest of relative investments. In the past six years, he's done more to try and break that trend, investing in a new practice facility and increasing the roster payroll, even if it was on marginal-to-hopeless players that have resulted in sub-mediocre performances.

But that's not the real problem with Donald Sterling. Nor is his rampant history of morally reprehensible behavior, from housing discrimination to alleged racist employer policies to sexual harassment . Even those allegations aren't strictly outside the lines of what we've seen from NBA ownership. The combination of the two puts him in the top five of worst NBA owners , but it's stuff like the interview with T.J. Simers of the LA Times this week that really push him over the top, that make him excel at being the absolute worst owner in the National Basketball Association, nay, all of sports. For a brief recap: Sterling doesn't know the names of the players he signed, it wasn't his idea to sign them, and he loves the way his picture looks in the paper.

I could lay out for you why the quotes he supplied Simers are so terrible, how they hurt the future of the franchise, how it immediately puts the new Clippers acquisition on edge, feeling unwanted by an owner who doesn't even know their name. But really, Kevin Arnovitz did that and did it as effectively as one can. Arnovitz takes one of my favorite approaches, likening the situation to terms you and I can relate to, a boss who doesn't even deign to know your name.

Instead, I want to ask a different question.

Why, in the name of Larry Bird almighty, does David Stern allow this to go on?

"What's he supposed to do?" you ask. How could the commissioner put any pressure on his ownership, who he represents most of the time? The answer is that owners come and go, but the Commish perseveres. And if we've seen anything, it's that David Stern has been ready, willing, and able to take care of messes in his own house and then make sure the spill doesn't happen again. Unless it's Sterling. In which case Sterling has simply designated him as the messy one, given him his own room in the basement to trash, and then soundly ignored the problem child. But the behavior Sterling acts out, in public, isn't just harmful to the Clippers franchise, a science experiment gone wrong from the start ("Oh, they used to be in San Diego, and before that they were in Buffalo, but then the owner wanted to swap with the Celtics' owner, so they did that. And they play in the same building as the Lakers, but really it's a shared kind of deal."). It's harmful to the league. And that's the kind of thing that shouldn't be allowed to happen. Be it Stern, or the rest of the ownership group (particularly Jerry Buss who pulled Sterling into this mess in the first place), someone needs to get involved.

The league has responded harshly, and swiftly, to any player that runs amuck and damages the value of the NBA brand. Yet this owner who repeatedly makes an outright disgrace of professional sports ownership continues to not only hammer whatever fledgling, starving fanbase they have, but to fans of all sports as well. The NBA is a worse league with Donald Sterling as an owner, more so than any other big boss in the league. For decades, the league has put up with all of it. The penny pinching. The lawsuits. The terrible decisions. The disgraceful quotes. The coaching carousel. The time has come. There is no longer a place in the NBA for an owner like that. Removing him would be a difficult, painful process that would need to be carried out behind closed doors.

But with the players and ownership headed for an all-out rumble in less than twelve months over the new CBA, is Sterling a cancerous asset the league wants to try and cover during negotiations? This isn't Mark Cuban, wily renegade media figure. This is Donald Sterling, toxic PR disaster zone. The NBA has welcomed in newer ownership comprised of smart, prolific businessmen, and while there will always be bad apples among those successful enough to purchase an NBA team, surely Sterling has injected too much rot in the franchise and in the league to be allowed to run free as he has.

The question is, how much is enough when it comes to Donald Sterling?

The answer so far is that the NBA is taking the same stance as Sterling has regarding his team's acquisition failures this summer. It's not their idea and not their fault.


 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com